We're two sisters who are craft book publishers and found ourselves in the midst of an avocado grove. We bought this house where we planned to conduct our publishing business and in the deal got 4 acres of avocado trees thrown in. Now we're not only publishers but ranchers as well! This blog is all about avocados and anything else that strikes my fancy.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Watch the beard grow SEPIA SATURDAY

I love this week's theme because I found some great photos from my collection that work so nicely.

Here is bearded Joseph Miller (also known as Uncle Joe by whoever had these photos previously). In this first of 4 photos he appears to be a youngish man. See how much hair he has. I think these might be his sisters and not 4 wives! This photo isn't marked so I haven't a clue who they are.





In this photo he seems to have trimmed his beard a bit. But his hairline is receding since the last photo. This one is marked:
"Francis Ellen Dull ( German) (married)
Joseph A Miller (german)
taken between 1850-1900?"  (wow that's a long time span. wish she would have narrowed it down a little)
"Mary Jane Miller's mother and father
Mary Jane Miller married James Engleman and became Mary Jane Engleman (Jenny)
Ellen and Dorothy's mother"





In this photo Uncle Joe's beard is longer and curlier and seems to have a part in the middle. He's just a little bit balder. This photo is marked:

"Uncle Joe Miller. I don't know the other one but feel sure you do."
Then someone has written "(Dorothy Engleman)"


I think it might be his granddaughter.






In this photo, Joe seems a lot older and maybe wiser. Beard is trimmed.  About the same baldness as in previous photo.

This is marked
"Four Generations"
Mr. Joseph Miller
Mrs. J. W. Engleson (his daughter Mary Jane?)
Mrs. C. O. Shoop (granddaughter, the same one as above maybe)
Virginia Shoop (great granddaughter)





I didn't have time to research this family. That's a project for a later time. But I just thought I'd share Uncle Joe's ever-changing beard and hairline with you.


click here for other Sepia Saturday stories

21 comments:

  1. nice progression. if i had time i'd look closer and try to help figure out his story.

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  2. Kristin,
    If only we had more time!!
    Nancy

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  3. The second photo, the one marked "between 1850-1900," I think you can safely assume was taken in the early to mid-1890s, judging by those "leg-of-mutton" sleeves. The last two look to me to be more like early 1900s, and back to the first one: I think that's the late 1880s, or 1890-91 at the latest. Thanks for sharing them.

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  4. Interesting to see how the beard progressed. Old photos indeed.

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  5. Thanks Brett for dating these photos.
    Nancy

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  6. The story (or history) of a beard - wonderful! A great sequence of photographs.

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  7. I'm with Brett on most of the dates. The clothing worn in the 1st photo suggests 1890s to me because women didn't generally wear a blouse/skirt combo until that decade. Photo #2 I'd put at 1895. Poor lady is dressed so dowdy! Photo #3 I'd agree with Brett. Photo #4 anywhere from 1898-1910. The dress on the baby is beautiful!

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  8. Brett and whowerethey are just a wealth of information. I was going to suggest that you would be able to date the photos based on the women's clothes, but I didn't have any hints past that.
    Anyway, your Uncle Joe was a very handsome and distinguished looking man.

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  9. I am surprised at all the long white beards in the photos today. When I see a man with one now, I think "Santa Claus" and that the man must be eccentric.

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  10. Wonderful continuity. As a whiskered guy too, I can appreciate the progression of gray. But I have noticed that beards are retained from a youthful commitment to never bother with shaving. Civil war veterans often kept their beards into the 20th century after they had gone out of fashion. Likewise very early c1850 photos of older men born in the 18th century show them without beards.

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  11. Hear, hear Mike. I am often asked, "Have you always had a beard?" to which I'm afraid I usually succumb by answering, "Well, when I was a lad ..." or something similar.

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  12. Wonderful old photos. Interesting that the nationality is noted too.

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  13. Lovely age progressions. I'm disappointed that those aren't his four wives. Now that would have been a story! I can't imagine falling in love with a whiskery man - style or not. I'm putting up with a mustache and that's as far as I go.

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  14. Great photos, great beard!

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  15. So interesting. What characters in their faces.

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  16. What a wonderful collection. It not only shows the progress of the beard but also the process of ageing itself - something the facial expression shouts out about his experiences of life as both a positive and negative force.

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  17. What a great group of people, especially where they are all looking off to the side....he does have a remarkable beard that is really something they sure loved wearing...... great Sepia photos what a nice collection! Thanks for stopping by my blog too!

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  18. Fascinating clues ripe for research!

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  19. Yes, that guy didn't want to ever have a short beard. I think a little styling was in order, but maybe that was his styling. Thanks for a fun blog.

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  20. Interesting to watch Uncle Joe's journey thorough the years.

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  21. if i'd stop trimming, i might one day have a beard as great as his!!...
    :)~
    HUGZ

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